The Moscow Photographs

Showcased below are interpretative photographs of 15 Moscow landmarks.  To view larger images or to read more details about these Soviet structures, please scroll down to the eight previous posts featured here on Haute Vitrine.

Luzhniki Stadium, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Luzhniki Stadium    architects: A. Vlasov, I. Rozhin, A. Ullas, A. Khryakov; 1954-56

Small Arena, Luzhniki Sports Complex, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Small Arena, Luzhniki Sports Complex    architects: A. Vlasov, I. Rozhin, A. Ullas, A. Khryakov; 1954-56

Swimming Stadium, Luzhniki Sports Complex, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Swimming Stadium, Luzhniki Sports Complex    architects: A. Vlasov, I. Rozhin, A. Ullas, A. Khryakov; 1954-56

Lenin's Tomb, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Lenin’s Tomb    architect: A. Shchusev; 1929-30

Saint Basil's Cathedral, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Saint Basil’s Cathedral    architects: Barma, Postnik; 1555-60

Bolshoi Theatre, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Bolshoi Theatre    architects: O. Bove, 1821-25; A. Cavos, 1856; restored 2005-11

Red Army Theatre, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Red Army Theatre    architects: K. Alabyan, V. Simbirtsev; 1934-40

City Hall, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

City Hall    architects: M. Kazakov, 1796; I. Fomin, 1930s; D. Chechulin, 1946

Dinamo Metro Station, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Dinamo Metro Station    architect: D. Chechulin, 1938

Ukraine Pavilion, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Ukraine Pavilion    architects: A. Tatsiy, K. Ivanchenko, 1938-39; renovated 1947-54

Main Entrance, Gorky Park, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Main Entrance, Gorky Park    architect of Gorky Park: K. Melnikov, 1928; entrance arch added 1955

Moskva Hotel, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Moskva Hotel    architects: A. Shchusev, L. Savelyev, O. Stapram, 1935; demolished 2004; shown above as rebuilt 2012

Lubyanka Building, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Lubyanka Building    architects: A. Ivanov, 1897; A. Shchusev, 1940-47, 1979-83

Russian White House, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Russian White House   architects: D. Chechulin, P. Shteller; 1965-81

Kotelnicheskaya Apartment Building, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Kotelnicheskaya Apartment Building   architects: D. Chechulin, A. Rostkevsky; 1948-52

all photographs © Leslie Hossack 2012

The Moscow Photographs, a collection of limited edition fine art prints by Leslie Hossack, examine Joseph Stalin’s architectural legacy in Russia’s capital. The structures are linked to Stalin by era, architect and anecdote. Hossack painstakingly deconstructs these historic landmarks, revealing them as they appeared when the architects first put their designs on paper.

These images are part of Leslie Hossack’s larger body of work that explores Nazi architecture in Berlin, sacred sites in Jerusalem and a Cold War bunker in Ottawa. To view more images, please visit her website.  lesliehossack.com

15 Moscow Landmarks – Part 8

Kotelnicheskaya Apartment Building, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Kotelnicheskaya Apartment Building, Moscow 2012

Russian White House, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Russian White House, Moscow 2012

© Leslie Hossack

Both buildings above were designed by Soviet architect Dmitry Chechulin.

The Kotelnicheskaya Apartment Building is one of Stalin’s high rises. These Moscow landmarks, nicknamed the Seven Sisters or Stalin’s wedding cakes, were built from 1947-1953 employing the construction technology of American skyscrapers. Dmitry Chechulin, city of Moscow architect from 1945-1949, oversaw the construction of all seven skyscrapers and also designed Kotelnicheskaya where he later lived.

The Russian White House, constructed from 1965-1981, is a government building in Moscow. It is famous for the attempted coup of August 1991 and Boris Yeltsin’s speech from the top of a Soviet tank. In 1993 the building was attacked again; blasts broke windows and smoke blackened the facade. Today, the windows and marble exterior gleam in the sunlight.

The Moscow Photographs, a collection of limited edition fine art prints by Leslie Hossack, examine Joseph Stalin’s architectural legacy in Russia’s capital. The structures are linked to Stalin by era, architect and anecdote. Hossack painstakingly deconstructs these historic landmarks, revealing them as they appeared when the architects first put their designs on paper.

The Moscow Photographs include: Luzhniki Stadium, Moscow’s 1980 Olympic Stadium; the Small Arena and Swimming Stadium also located at the Luzhniki Olympic Sports Complex; Lenin’s Tomb and Saint Basil’s Cathedral in Red Square; Bolshoi Theatre and Red Army Theatre; Moscow City Hall and Dinamo Metro Station; Gorky Park and Ukraine Pavilion; Lubyanka Building and Moskva Hotel; Russian White House and Kotelnicheskaya Apartment Building, one of Stalin’s high-rises known as the Seven Sisters.

These images are part of Leslie Hossack’s larger body of work that explores Nazi architecture in Berlin, sacred sites in Jerusalem and a Cold War bunker in Ottawa. To view more images, please visit her website.  lesliehossack.com

15 Moscow Landmarks – Part 7

Lubyanka Building, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Lubyanka Building, Moscow 2012

Moskva Hotel, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Moskva Hotel, Moscow 2012

© Leslie Hossack

The Lubyanka Building was the headquarters of the KGB, the Soviet Secret Police. During Stalin’s purges, thousands of citizens were arrested as enemies of the people and imprisoned in the basement of Lubyanka. There they were interrogated, tortured, executed, or exiled to Siberia. The celebrated book The Gulag Archipelago, written by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, described the system of Soviet prisons and labour camps.

In 1935, the Moskva Hotel was one of the first to be built in Stalin’s Soviet Moscow. The hotel’s second phase became operational in 1977, the 60th anniversary of the October Revolution. This historic hotel was demolished in 2004. The new hotel, shown above, is a replica of the original and is scheduled to open in 2014.

The Moscow Photographs, a collection of limited edition fine art prints by Leslie Hossack, examine Joseph Stalin’s architectural legacy in Russia’s capital. The structures are linked to Stalin by era, architect and anecdote. Hossack painstakingly deconstructs these historic landmarks, revealing them as they appeared when the architects first put their designs on paper.

The Moscow Photographs include: Luzhniki Stadium, Moscow’s 1980 Olympic Stadium; the Small Arena and Swimming Stadium also located at the Luzhniki Olympic Sports Complex; Lenin’s Tomb and Saint Basil’s Cathedral in Red Square; Bolshoi Theatre and Red Army Theatre; Moscow City Hall and Dinamo Metro Station; Gorky Park and Ukraine Pavilion; Lubyanka Building and Moskva Hotel; Russian White House and Kotelnicheskaya Apartment Building, one of Stalin’s high-rises known as the Seven Sisters.

These images are part of Leslie Hossack’s larger body of work that explores Nazi architecture in Berlin, sacred sites in Jerusalem and a Cold War bunker in Ottawa. To view more images, please visit her website.  lesliehossack.com

15 Moscow Landmarks – Part 6

Ukraine Pavilion, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Ukraine Pavilion, Moscow 2012

Main Entrance, Gorky Park, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Main Entrance, Gorky Park, Moscow 2012

© Leslie Hossack

The Ukraine Pavilion, now Pavilion 58 at the All Russia Exhibition Centre, was originally constructed in 1938-39 for the All Union Agricultural Exhibition. Today, this massive exhibition space is still home to flamboyant pavilions from the 1930s that were designed to showcase various regions of the Soviet Union. The exhibition site, with its many historic pavilions, is a lasting example of Stalin’s architectural propaganda.

Gorky Park, the Central Park of Culture and Leisure dating back to 1928, was designed by Soviet constructivist architect Konstantin Melnikov. The Entrance Arch shown above was constructed in 1955; it is an impressive example of Stalinist classicism. Adorned with wreaths, stars, hammers and sickles, the arch is topped with the head of Lenin surrounded by flags.

The Moscow Photographs, a collection of limited edition fine art prints by Leslie Hossack, examine Joseph Stalin’s architectural legacy in Russia’s capital. The structures are linked to Stalin by era, architect and anecdote. Hossack painstakingly deconstructs these historic landmarks, revealing them as they appeared when the architects first put their designs on paper.

The Moscow Photographs include: Luzhniki Stadium, Moscow’s 1980 Olympic Stadium; the Small Arena and Swimming Stadium also located at the Luzhniki Olympic Sports Complex; Lenin’s Tomb and Saint Basil’s Cathedral in Red Square; Bolshoi Theatre and Red Army Theatre; Moscow City Hall and Dinamo Metro Station; Gorky Park and Ukraine Pavilion; Lubyanka Building and Moskva Hotel; Russian White House and Kotelnicheskaya Apartment Building, one of Stalin’s high-rises known as the Seven Sisters.

These images are part of Leslie Hossack’s larger body of work that explores Nazi architecture in Berlin, sacred sites in Jerusalem and a Cold War bunker in Ottawa. To view more images, please visit her website.  lesliehossack.com

15 Moscow Landmarks – Part 5

City Hall, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

City Hall, Moscow 2012

Dinamo Metro Station, Moscow 2012 by Leslie Hossack

Dinamo Metro Station, Moscow 2012

© Leslie Hossack

Moscow City Hall is one of the few bright spots of colour in a city of grey. Built as a palace in 1796 and rebuilt in the 1930s, Stalin had the structure redesigned yet again in 1945-46. Two stories were added by celebrated Soviet architect Dmitry Chechulin and the facades were totally changed.

Chechulin was also the architect of the vestibules of the Dinamo Metro station which opened in 1938. The Moscow Metro is arguably the most beautiful in the world; the stations were conceived by Stalin as palaces for the people. Today, the Moscow metro is the busiest metro system in the world with more than 9 million passengers every weekday.  As of 2013, there were 12 lines and 192 stations and more opening every year.

The Moscow Photographs, a collection of limited edition fine art prints by Leslie Hossack, examine Joseph Stalin’s architectural legacy in Russia’s capital. The structures are linked to Stalin by era, architect and anecdote. Hossack painstakingly deconstructs these historic landmarks, revealing them as they appeared when the architects first put their designs on paper.

The Moscow Photographs include: Luzhniki Stadium, Moscow’s 1980 Olympic Stadium; the Small Arena and Swimming Stadium also located at the Luzhniki Olympic Sports Complex; Lenin’s Tomb and Saint Basil’s Cathedral in Red Square; Bolshoi Theatre and Red Army Theatre; Moscow City Hall and Dinamo Metro Station; Gorky Park and Ukraine Pavilion; Lubyanka Building and Moskva Hotel; Russian White House and Kotelnicheskaya Apartment Building, one of Stalin’s high-rises known as the Seven Sisters.

These images are part of Leslie Hossack’s larger body of work that explores Nazi architecture in Berlin, sacred sites in Jerusalem and a Cold War bunker in Ottawa. To view more images, please visit her website.  lesliehossack.com

preventing anarchy after a Soviet nuclear attack

Departmental Office, Level 300, The Diefenbunker, Ottawa 2010

© Leslie Hossack

In December 1961, Canada’s Central Emergency Government Headquarters, aka the Diefenbunker, became operational. During the Cold War, in the event of a Soviet nuclear attack, designated government officials would report to Canada’s flagship bunker in Carp. It contained over 300 rooms and was designed to shelter 535 individuals. Built secretly between 1959 and 1961 just outside of Ottawa, the Diefenbunker was nicknamed after Prime Minister John G. Diefenbaker.

The image above shows one of the 18 federal government departmental offices in the bunker. Pictured here is the office of Energy Mines and Resources, outfitted with furniture and equipment from the 1980s and 1990s. (To see more details, please click on the photograph.)

Located on Level 300, near the War Cabinet Room, were offices for the departments of Agriculture, Canadian Mortgage and Housing, Public Works, and so on. Approximately 20 to 30 officials would work in each department. During a nuclear attack, these individuals would provide support to their Ministers who would brief government representatives assembled in the massive underground bunker. The Secretariat would coordinate the flow of information between the War Cabinet and the various government departments.

The Diefenbunker was shut down in 1994, after 33 years of operation. It is now Canada’s Cold War Museum and a National Historic Site. For more information, please visit Canada’s Cold War Museum and Parks Canada.