Haute Vitrine

PHOTOGRAPHS by LESLIE HOSSACK

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Hammershøi Portraits: The David Collection

1889, Woman Knitting. The Artist's Mother by Leslie HossackWoman Knitting. The Artist’s Mother (1889)
Collection: Davids Samling, Copenhagen

1889-1900, Woman Seated on a White Chair by Leslie HossackWoman Seated on a White Chair, on reverse of above canvas (1899-1900)
Collection: Davids Samling, Copenhagen

1891, Evening in the Drawing Room. Two Women at a Round Table by Leslie HossackEvening in the Drawing Room. Two Women at a Round Table (1891)
Collection: Davids Samling, Copenhagen

1896, Portrait The Artist's Sister Anna (drawn replica) by Leslie HossackPortrait of a Young Girl. The Artist’s Sister Anna, drawn replica (1896)
Collection: Davids Samling, Copenhagen

1892, Double Portrait of the Artist and His Wife, Paris by Leslie HossackDouble Portrait of the Artist and His Wife. Paris (1892)
Collection: Davids Samling, Copenhagen

all photographs © 2019 Leslie Hossack

Vilhelm Hammershøi is best known for his haunting interiors, but his portraits and self-portraits are equally tantalizing. Double Portrait of the Artist and His Wife. Paris (1892), shown immediately above, is an excellent example of both. Not even the best reproduction of this painting can fully prepare the viewer for the visceral experience of actually standing in front of this engaging yet aloof young couple. Their direct gaze is softly unfocused and their enigmatic expressions are benign and beguiling at the same time.  

“One feature is found in Vilhelm Hammershøi’s self-portrait as well as virtually all his other portraits: the figures eyes are not turned directly at the observer. They look inward… His portraits are mental images.”
                        Henrik Wivel, Hammershøi in the David Collection (2017)

Hammershøi painted portraits of family members and friends; he made it clear that he did not wish to paint the portraits of people whom he did not know. His main subjects were his wife Ida, his mother Frederikke, his sister Anna, his brother Svend and his friends and colleagues. The portrait below is of the wife of one of Hammershøi’s acquaintances. As with all images in this series by Leslie Hossack, it was photographed as it appeared on view in the gallery, colour cast, reflections on the glass and all.

1896, Portrait of Thora Bendix by Leslie HossackPortrait of Thora Bendix (1896)
Collection: Davids Samling, Copenhagen

Hammershøi’s oeuvre consists of interiors, landscapes, architecture, nudes and portraits like the six shown above. But it was his interiors that were the most popular in his lifetime (1864-1916) and continue to draw the strongest response today. Hammershøi painted over 70 interiors in the various apartments he shared with his wife Ida in Copenhagen. Their home was both his studio and a major motif in his work.

Over a century ago, Danish painter Vilhelm Hammershøi elevated
“Stay At Home. Work At Home.” to an art form.

Leslie Hossack’s Hammershøi Photographs are part of a larger body of work that explores Hitler’s Berlin, Stalin’s Moscow, Mussolini’s Rome, Churchill’s London, contested sites in Jerusalem, the NATO Headquarter Camp in Kosovo, buildings linked to the Japanese Canadian internment during WWII, the D-Day beaches of Normandy, the Nazi-occupied Channel Islands, Sigmund Freud’s Vienna, and the Freemasons of Scotland.

To view more photographs by Leslie Hossack, please visit lesliehossack.com

Hammershøi Landscapes: The David Collection

1892, Kongevejen at Gentofte by Leslie Hossack

Kongevejen at Gentofte (1892)
Collection: Davids Samling, Copenhagen

1900, From a Farm. Refnoes by Leslie Hossack

From a Farm. Refnœs (1900)
Collection: Davids Samling, Copenhagen

1904, Young Beech Forest, Frederiksvoerk by Leslie Hossack

Young Beech Forest, Frederiksvoerk (1904)
Collection: Davids Samling, Copenhagen

1905, Three Ships, Christianshavn Canal by Leslie Hossack

Three Ships, Christianshavn Canal (1905)
Collection: Davids Samling, Copenhagen

1906, The Rowan Avenue at Snekkersten by Leslie Hossack

The Rowan Avenue at Snekkersten (1906)
Collection: Davids Samling, Copenhagen

all photographs © 2019 Leslie Hossack

Vilhelm Hammershøi usually painted indoors, but during the summer months he did paint landscapes outdoors, in various locations around Denmark. The landscapes in his oeuvre are fewer, and certainly less well known, than his celebrated interiors.

Naturally, the outdoor summer light had a different quality than the winter light that streamed through the windows of Hammershøi’s Copenhagen apartment. But upon contemplation, one can see a similarity between his interiors and landscapes.

“… essentially, their mood is identical to the mood in the artist’s other output. There is a feeling of alienation and desertion in Hammershøi’s landscapes. They are not devoid of the hallmarks of agrarian culture, such as farms, mills, and fields; they are devoid of biological activity and life.”

Henrik Wivel, Hammershøi in the David Collection (2017)

Hammershøi’s oeuvre consists of portraits, nudes, architecture, interiors and landscapes like the five shown above. But it was his interiors that were the most popular in his lifetime (1864-1916) and continue to draw the strongest response today. Hammershøi painted over 70 interiors in the various apartments he shared with his wife Ida in Copenhagen. Their home was both his studio and a major motif in his work.

Over a century ago, Danish painter Vilhelm Hammershøi elevated
“Stay At Home. Work At Home.” to an art form.

Leslie Hossack’s Hammershøi Photographs are part of a larger body of work that explores Hitler’s Berlin, Stalin’s Moscow, Mussolini’s Rome, Churchill’s London, contested sites in Jerusalem, the NATO Headquarter Camp in Kosovo, buildings linked to the Japanese Canadian internment during WWII, the D-Day beaches of Normandy, the Nazi-occupied Channel Islands, Sigmund Freud’s Vienna, and the Freemasons of Scotland.

To view more photographs by Leslie Hossack, please visit lesliehossack.com

Vilhelm Hammershøi: The David Collection

1903, Room with a View of the External Gallery. Strandgade 30 by Leslie Hossack

Room with a View of the External Gallery. Strandgade 30 (1903)
Collection: Davids Samling, Copenhagen

1905, Open Doors. Strandgade 30 by Leslie Hossack

Open Doors. Strandgade 30 (1905)
Collection: Davids Samling, Copenhagen

1906, Sitting Room. Study in Sunlight. Strandgade 30 by leslie Hossack

Sitting Room. Study in Sunlight. Strandgade 30 (1906)
Collection: Davids Samling, Copenhagen

all photographs © 2019 Leslie Hossack

After months of researching Danish artist Vilhelm Hammershøi, Leslie Hossack travelled to Copenhagen to view his paintings as they were meant to be seen – framed and hanging on a wall.

Hossack photographed works by Hammershøi in three galleries in Copenhagen, as well as Paris, Ottawa and Toronto. It is important to note that the 100 images she created are not colour corrected; rather, they reflect the actual viewing conditions encountered in each gallery. For example, the Hammershøi paintings in the David Collection are in a room with coral coloured walls. Thus the photographs above have a red cast to them.

Hammershøi’s works, particularly his interiors, are known for their lack of colour. But in reality, his muted grays reward the gallery-goer with a tantalizing range of luminous colours, as can be seen in the images above.

“The artist developed into a value painter, in whose work each gray tone contains an undercoat of red, brown, green and blue, for example, but whose overall expression is gray.”

Henrik Wivel, Hammershøi in the David Collection (2017)

Above we see the interior of the apartment at Strandgade 30 where Vilhelm and his wife Ida lived from 1898 to 1909. Characteristically, the sparse rooms are devoid of people.

Hammershøi’s oeuvre consists of portraits, nudes, landscapes, architecture and interiors, but it is his interiors, like the three shown above, that were the most popular in his lifetime (1864-1916) and continue to draw the strongest response today. Hammershøi painted over 70 interiors in the various apartments he shared with his wife Ida in Copenhagen. Their home was both his studio and a major motif in his work.

Over a century ago, Danish painter Vilhelm Hammershøi elevated
“Stay At Home. Work At Home.” to an art form.

Leslie Hossack’s Hammershøi Photographs are part of a larger body of work that explores Hitler’s Berlin, Stalin’s Moscow, Mussolini’s Rome, Churchill’s London, contested sites in Jerusalem, the NATO Headquarter Camp in Kosovo, buildings linked to the Japanese Canadian internment during WWII, the D-Day beaches of Normandy, the Nazi-occupied Channel Islands, Sigmund Freud’s Vienna, and the Freemasons of Scotland.

To view more photographs by Leslie Hossack, please visit lesliehossack.com

Vilhelm Hammershøi: Ordrupgaard Museum

1901, Interior with Piano and Woman in Black by Leslie Hossack

Interior with Piano and Woman in Black. From the Artist’s Home at Strandgade 30 (1901)
Collection: Ordrupgaard Museum, Copenhagen

1907, Interior with Cabinet Sofa. Interior by Leslie Hossack

Interior with Cabinet Sofa (1907)
Collection: Ordrupgaard Museum, Copenhagen

1910, Interior with Seated Woman by Leslie Hossack

Interior with Seated Woman (c. 1910)
Collection: Ordrupgaard Museum, Copenhagen

1913, The Tall Windows. Interior from the Artist's Home by Leslie Hossack

The Tall Windows. Interior from the Artist’s Home, Strandgade 25 (1913)
Collection: Ordrupgaard Museum, Copenhagen

1914, The Four Rooms by Leslie Hossack

The Four Rooms. Interior from the Artist’s Home, Strandgade 25 (1914)
Collection: Ordrupgaard Museum, Copenhagen

all photographs © 2018 Leslie Hossack

In 2018, the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa (NGC) hosted an exhibition entitled Impressionist Treasures, featuring works from the Ordrupgaard Museum, Copenhagen. Among the 76 paintings were several from the Danish Golden Age, including five interiors by Vilhelm Hammershøi.

Leslie Hossack photographed these Hammershøi works as they hung in situ, in the NGC. Danish painter Vilhelm Hammershøi and his wife Ida lived in an apartment at Strandgade 30 in Copenhagen from 1898 to 1909. Then from 1909 to 1913, they lived at Bredgade 25. Finally the couple moved to Strandgade 25, where they remained until Vilhelm’s death in 1916. The first two images above reveal the interior of Strandgade 30 while the last two show the inside of the artist’s apartment at Strandgade 25.

Hossack wrote: “One enters Hammershøi’s private home, moves around his physical space and then slowly encounters one’s own soul… His genius is to seem to deal with the domestic while all the while dealing with the universal.”

Hammershøi’s oeuvre consists of portraits, nudes, landscapes, architecture and interiors, but it is his interiors, like the five shown above, that were the most popular in his lifetime (1864-1916) and continue to draw the strongest response today. Hammershøi painted over 70 interiors in the apartments he shared with his wife Ida in Copenhagen. Their home was both his studio and a major motif in his work.

Over a century ago, Danish painter Vilhelm Hammershøi elevated
“Stay At Home. Work At Home.” to an art form.

Leslie Hossack’s Hammershøi Photographs are part of a larger body of work that explores Hitler’s Berlin, Stalin’s Moscow, Mussolini’s Rome, Churchill’s London, contested sites in Jerusalem, the NATO Headquarter Camp in Kosovo, buildings linked to the Japanese Canadian internment during WWII, the D-Day beaches of Normandy, the Nazi-occupied Channel Islands, Sigmund Freud’s Vienna, and the Freemasons of Scotland.

To view more photographs by Leslie Hossack, please visit lesliehossack.com

Vilhelm Hammershøi

1904, Hammershøi, Interior with Four Etchings, photo by Leslie Hossack

Interior with Four Etchings (1904)
Collection: Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto

1910, Sunshine in the Drawing Room by Leslie Hossack

Sunshine in the Drawing Room (1910)
Collection: National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa

photographs © 2019 Leslie Hossack

In 2015, the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto (AGO) acquired Danish artist Vilhelm Hammershøi’s painting Interior with Four Etchings (1904). This was the first time one of his works entered a public collection in Canada. Then, in 2017, the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa (NGC) acquired Sunshine in the Drawing Room (1910).

Leslie Hossack photographed these two paintings by Hammershøi in 2019 as they hung in situ, in Ottawa and Toronto. Hossack wrote: “I stood before these paintings transfixed. I was besotted. I was smitten.” And so began her quest to photograph his works abroad. The result, “100 Hammershøi’s by Hossack,” will be posted here on Haute Vitrine.

Hammershøi’s oeuvre consists of portraits, nudes, landscapes, architecture and interiors, but it is his interiors, like the two shown above, that were most popular in his lifetime (1864-1916) and continue to draw the strongest response today. Hammershøi painted over 70 interiors in the apartment he shared with his wife Ida in Copenhagen. Their home was both his studio and a major motif in his work.

Over a century ago, Danish painter Vilhelm Hammershøi elevated
“Stay At Home. Work At Home.” to an art form.

Leslie Hossack’s Hammershøi Photographs are part of a larger body of work that explores Hitler’s Berlin, Stalin’s Moscow, Mussolini’s Rome, Churchill’s London, contested sites in Jerusalem, the NATO Headquarter Camp in Kosovo, buildings linked to the Japanese Canadian internment during WWII, the D-Day beaches of Normandy, the Nazi-occupied Channel Islands, Sigmund Freud’s Vienna, and the Freemasons of Scotland.

To view more photographs by Leslie Hossack, please visit lesliehossack.com

Churchill’s Darkest Hour

Gary Oldman and Joe Wright visit National Churchill Library and Center
and Leslie Hossack’s exhibition Charting Churchill

Photo courtesy NCLC.

Darkest Hour star Gary Oldman and director Joe Wright recently visited the National Churchill Library and Center in Washington DC. While there, they took in Leslie Hossack’s exhibition Charting Churchill which features a selection of photographs by the award-winning Canadian photographer. All 60 photographs from Hossack’s Churchill series can be viewed in previous posts on this blog. Many of the locations seen in Darkest Hour are presented in these photographs.

Darkest Hour is expected by many to win Oscars in 2018. The Academy Award nomination list will be announced shortly.

Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill was born November 30th 1874 at Blenheim Palace. He died 90 years later at his home in London, on January 24th 1965.

In Darkest Hour, Gary Oldman portrayed Winston Churchill when he became British Prime Minister in May 1940, ten months into World War Two. The film covers the few short weeks leading up to the Dunkirk evacuation.

Sir Winston Churchill – politician, parliamentarian, prime minister; cavalry officer, infantry man, military strategist; reporter, author, orator; statesman, Nobel laureate, Knight of the Garter; painter, brick layer, world traveller; husband, father, grandfather.

Sir Winston Churchill – the man who loved: dogs, cats and horses; exotic butterflies, ornamental fish and roses; Cuban cigars, fine food and Pol Roger champagne; afternoon naps, hot baths and late nights; Chartwell, Blenheim Palace and the Houses of Parliament; hats of all kinds, bespoke tailoring and polka dot bow ties; and the man many credit with saving the world from Nazi tyranny.

Leslie Hossack’s Churchill Photographs are part of her larger body of work that explores Nazi architecture in Berlin, Stalinist structures in Moscow, contested sites in Jerusalem, a Cold War bunker in Ottawa, NATO’s Headquarter Camp in Kosovo, buildings linked to the Japanese Canadian internment during World War Two, the D-Day landing beaches in Normandy, the Nazi-occupied Channel Islands, Freud’s pre-war Vienna and Mussolini’s Rome.

To view more photographs by Leslie Hossack, please visit lesliehossack.com

To preview her book Charting Churchill, visit ChartingChurchill.com

Charting Churchill: Saint Martin’s Churchyard, Bladon

Saint Martin's Churchyard, Bladon 2014 by Leslie Hossack

Saint Martin’s Churchyard, Bladon 2014

© Leslie Hossack

Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill was born November 30th 1874 at Blenheim Palace. He died 90 years later at his home in London, on January 24th 1965.

The year 2015 marks the 50th anniversary of the death of Sir Winston Churchill. After a state funeral in London, Sir Winston was buried on January 30th 1965 in the Churchill family plot in Saint Martin’s Churchyard in Bladon, just a mile from where he was born. On the day of his funeral, flowers arrived in the churchyard for the private family graveside service. In the pamphlet Sir Winston Churchill and the Bladon Connection, published by the Parish Church of St. Martin, Bladon, it is noted that the Queen’s flowers were white and exquisite, and written in her own hand were the words: “Winston Churchill, From the Nation and Commonwealth, In Grateful Remembrance, Elizabeth R.” Lady Churchill’s flowers are described as glorious red, accompanied by a note reading: “To Winston with all my love, Clemmie.”

And so, after a lifetime of pomp and circumstance, Winston was quietly laid to rest in a tiny plot behind Saint Martin’s Church. Here, Clemmie said goodbye to Winnie: husband, father, grandfather; cavalry officer, infantry man, military strategist; reporter, author, orator; politician, parliamentarian, prime minister; statesman, Nobel laureate, Knight of the Garter; painter, brick layer, world traveller. Here, in a country churchyard, Clementine bade farewell to Winston, the man who loved: dogs, cats and horses; exotic butterflies, ornamental fish and roses; Cuban cigars, fine food and Pol Roger champagne; afternoon naps, hot baths and late nights; Blenheim Palace, Chartwell Manor and the Houses of Parliament; hats of all kinds, bespoke tailoring and polka dot bow ties; and the man that many credit with saving the world from Nazi tyranny.

The image featured above is part of the limited edition collector’s portfolio created by Leslie Hossack to mark the 50th anniversary of the death of Sir Winston Churchill. She presents locations that chart Churchill’s personal and political life, from his birth at Blenheim Palace in 1874 until his death in London in 1965. THE CHURCHILL PHOTOGRAPHS are part of Hossack’s larger body of work that explores Nazi architecture in Berlin, Stalinist structures in Moscow, contested sites in Jerusalem, a Cold War bunker in Ottawa, NATO’s Headquarter Camp in Kosovo, and buildings linked to the Japanese Canadian internment during World War II.

To view more photographs, please visit Leslie’s website.  lesliehossack.com