CONSTRUCTED RECOLLECTION – LIVING ROOM

LIVING ROOM, 2022 by Leslie HossackLiving Room
© 2022 Leslie Hossack

“I remember my parents painting the colourless walls of our rented bungalow. It was common in the 1950s for each bedroom to be a different pastel colour – mint green, baby blue, soft yellow. One of my core recollections involves endlessly pouring over house paint colour charts – very potent objects of memory. From them I learned about the link between colour and language. I was astonished to discover that the bright colour of the accent wall in our dark green living room was Chartreuse. Recently I found a vintage Kem Tone house paint advertisement featuring a picture of a living room painted Parklane Green with a Chartreuse accent wall. Clearly this had been the inspiration for my parents’ colour scheme decades ago; it was also the inspiration for my new work entitled Living Room.”  

CONSTRUCTED RECOLLECTION: An Abstract Autobiography – Childhood Colour Coded
Selected images from Leslie Hossack’s series Constructed Recollection featured in online exhibition at TheCommotion.ca
21 January – 25 February 2023

PRINT SIZES
archival prints are available on Hahnemühle Gloss Baryta in two sizes: 
The Portfolio Collection: 11 x 16.5 in. (paper size 19 x 13 in.)
The Gallery Collection: 24 x 36 in.

To view more work by Leslie Hossack, please visit lesliehossack.ca

ABOUT Leslie Hossack

CONSTRUCTED RECOLLECTION – LIFE SAVERS

LIFE SAVERS, 2022 by Leslie HossackLife Savers
© 2022 Leslie Hossack

“When I was growing up, candies such as jelly beans and Life Savers were a colourful treat. A roll of Life Savers could often be found tucked away in Grandma’s purse or hidden inside a Christmas stocking. In the 1950s, Life Savers came in five flavours: lemon, pineapple, orange, lime and cherry. The image here, Life Savers, is inspired by memories of the paper wrapper that surrounded the tin foil cylinder of candies – the only candies with the hole in the middle.” 

CONSTRUCTED RECOLLECTION: An Abstract Autobiography – Childhood Colour Coded
Selected images from Leslie Hossack’s series Constructed Recollection featured in online exhibition at TheCommotion.ca
21 January – 25 February 2023

PRINT SIZES
archival prints are available on Hahnemühle Gloss Baryta in two sizes: 
The Portfolio Collection: 11 x 13.75 in. (paper size 19 x 13 in.)
The Gallery Collection: 24 x 30 in.

To view more work by Leslie Hossack, please visit lesliehossack.ca

ABOUT Leslie Hossack

CONSTRUCTED RECOLLECTION – CRINOLINE

CRINOLINE, 2022 by Leslie HossackCrinoline
© 2022 Leslie Hossack

“This image was inspired by my first party dress. In the 1950s, birthday parties were very exciting, but low key compared to today. Four or five neighbourhood friends would be invited. There were balloons, and games such as musical chairs and pin the tail on the donkey. The food consisted of sandwiches cut in the shape of triangles with the crusts removed, celery sticks and carrot sticks, birthday cake and ice cream. Everyone wore their very best clothes. For me, that meant shinny black patent shoes and bright white ankle socks. But most of all, it meant I got to wear my party dress. It was pink, with a full skirt, puff sleeves and a Peter Pan collar. I was only six years old, but I clearly remember the feel of the soft furry black velvet ribbon that tied around the waist and the prickly scratchy net crinoline that was attached underneath.”

CONSTRUCTED RECOLLECTION: An Abstract Autobiography – Childhood Colour Coded
Selected images from Leslie Hossack’s series Constructed Recollection featured in online exhibition at TheCommotion.ca
21 January – 25 February 2023

PRINT SIZES
archival prints are available on Hahnemühle Gloss Baryta in two sizes: 
The Portfolio Collection: 11 x 16.5 in. (paper size 19 x 13 in.)
The Gallery Collection: 24 x 36 in.

To view more work by Leslie Hossack, please visit lesliehossack.ca

ABOUT Leslie Hossack

CONSTRUCTED RECOLLECTION – TELEPHONE

TELEPHONE, 2022 by Leslie HossackTelephone
© 2022 Leslie Hossack

“This image was inspired by the first telephone I remember as a young child. There was only one phone in the house and it was a landline. It was also a party line, meaning that two households shared the same line. Each house had a different ring tone, so you knew who the incoming call was intended for. However, if you picked up the phone to call out and the other party was already on the line, you could hear their conversation. In the 1950s, telephones were black, with a heavy handset and a slow rotary dial. Long distance calls were very expensive so they were rare and kept as short as possible. Residential phones were used for significant communications and treated with reverence.”

CONSTRUCTED RECOLLECTION: An Abstract Autobiography – Childhood Colour Coded
Selected images from Leslie Hossack’s series Constructed Recollection featured in online exhibition at TheCommotion.ca
21 January – 25 February 2023

PRINT SIZES
archival prints are available on Hahnemühle Gloss Baryta in two sizes: 
The Portfolio Collection: 11 x 16.5 in. (paper size 19 x 13 in.)
The Gallery Collection: 24 x 36 in.

To view more work by Leslie Hossack, please visit lesliehossack.ca

ABOUT Leslie Hossack

CONSTRUCTED RECOLLECTION – PRINT CATALOGUE

CONSTRUCTED RECOLLECTION Book Cover by Leslie Hossack
 

CONSTRUCTED RECOLLECTION – New Publication Now Available
© 2022 Leslie Hossack

“My latest publication CONSTRUCTED RECOLLECTION features 22 full-page colour reproductions. This series explores the premise that colour is autobiographical. The images present a colour-coded record of my childhood, as unique as my physical DNA. I learned about colours through concrete objects: crayons, clothes, mail order catalogues and so on. This collection was inspired by early memories of the 1950s, an analogue world. By contrast, the creation of this work was completely digital.”

Signed catalogues and selected prints from Leslie Hossack’s series Constructed Recollection will be available at TheCommotion.ca
Online exhibition runs 21 January – 25 February 2023.

Constructed Recollection catalogues consist of 44 pages and measure 11.8 x 9 in.

To view more work by Leslie Hossack, please visit lesliehossack.ca

ABOUT Leslie Hossack

CONSTRUCTED RECOLLECTION – REGALIA

REGALIA, Ottawa 2022 by Leslie HossackRegalia
© 2022 Leslie Hossack

CONSTRUCTED RECOLLECTION: An Abstract Autobiography – Childhood Colour Coded
Selected images from Leslie Hossack’s series Constructed Recollection featured in online exhibition at TheCommotion.ca
21 January – 25 February 2023

ABOVE: Regalia was inspired by Queen Elizabeth’s 1953 coronation.

PRINT SIZES
archival prints are available on Hahnemühle Gloss Baryta in two sizes: 
The Portfolio Collection: 11 x 16.5 in. (paper size 19 x 13 in.)
The Gallery Collection: 24 x 36 in.

To view more work by Leslie Hossack, please visit lesliehossack.ca

ABOUT Leslie Hossack

CONSTRUCTED RECOLLECTION – WINTER

WINTER, 2022 by Leslie HossackWinter
© 2022 Leslie Hossack

This new body of work, CONSTRUCTED RECOLLECTION, is an abstract autobiography inspired by childhood memories of colour.

ABOVE: “Winter was inspired by early memories of a striped wool blanket. Here in Canada, the hot summers and cold winters make seasonal changes of clothing and bedding an annual ritual. Every autumn when I was very small, my mother replaced the light summer covers on my bed with a heavy wool blanket. During the long nights and bright days of winter, the colours of that blanket entered my soul where they remain to this day.”

CONSTRUCTED RECOLLECTION: An Abstract Autobiography – Childhood Colour Coded
Selected images from Leslie Hossack’s series Constructed Recollection featured in online exhibition at TheCommotion.ca
21 January – 25 February 2023

PRINT SIZES
archival prints are available on Hahnemühle Gloss Baryta in two sizes: 
The Portfolio Collection: 11 x 13.75 in. (paper size 19 x 13 in.)
The Gallery Collection: 24 x 30 in.

To view more work by Leslie Hossack, please visit lesliehossack.ca

ABOUT Leslie Hossack

Vilhelm Hammershøi (1864-1916)

1904, Hammershøi, Interior with Four Etchings, photo by Leslie HossackInterior with Four Etchings (1904)
Collection: Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto

1910, Sunshine in the Drawing Room photograph by Leslie HossackSunshine in the Drawing Room (1910)
Collection: National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa

photographs © 2019 Leslie Hossack

In 2020, governments the world over declared: “Stay-at-home. Work-at-home.” More than a century ago, Danish painter Vilhelm Hammershøi (1864-1916) elevated this edict to a lifestyle and an art form.

In 2015, the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto (AGO) acquired Danish artist Vilhelm Hammershøi’s painting Interior with Four Etchings (1904). This was the first time one of his works entered a public collection in Canada. Then, in 2017, the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa (NGC) acquired Sunshine in the Drawing Room  (1910).

To find out more about Vilhelm Hammershøi’s Sunshine in the Drawing Room at the NGC and how it inspired Leslie Hossack’s current series, please see the article in The National Gallery of Canada Magazine titled “Hammershøi to Hossack: Inspiration and Resources.”

Leslie Hossack photographed two paintings by Hammershøi in 2019 as they hung in situ, in Ottawa and Toronto. Hossack wrote: “I stood before these paintings transfixed. I was besotted. I was smitten.” And so began her quest to photograph his works abroad. The resulting “100 Hammershøis by Hossack” are featured here on Haute Vitrine.

Hammershøi’s oeuvre consists of portraits, nudes, landscapes, architecture and interiors, but it is his interiors, like the two shown above, that were most popular in his lifetime (1864-1916) and continue to draw the strongest response today. Hammershøi painted over 100 interiors in the various apartments he shared with his wife Ida in Copenhagen. Their home was both his studio and a major motif in his work.

Leslie Hossack’s Hammershøi Photographs are part of a larger body of work that explores Hitler’s Berlin, Stalin’s Moscow, Mussolini’s Rome, Churchill’s London, contested sites in Jerusalem, the NATO Headquarter Camp in Kosovo, buildings linked to the Japanese Canadian internment during WWII, the D-Day landing beaches of Normandy, the Nazi-occupied Channel Islands, Scotland’s Freemasons and Sigmund Freud’s Vienna.

To view more photographs by Leslie Hossack, please visit lesliehossack.com

Hammershøi: The National Gallery of Canada

1901, Interior with Piano and Woman in Black by Leslie HossackInterior with Piano, Woman in Black. From the Artist’s Home at Strandgade 30 (1901)
Collection: Ordrupgaard, Copenhagen

1907, Interior with Cabinet Sofa. Interior by Leslie HossackInterior with Cabinet Sofa (1907)
Collection: Ordrupgaard, Copenhagen

1910, Interior with Seated Woman by Leslie HossackInterior with Seated Woman (c. 1910)
Collection: Ordrupgaard, Copenhagen

1913, The Tall Windows. Interior from the Artist's Home by Leslie HossackThe Tall Windows. Interior from the Artist’s Home, Strandgade 25 (1913)
Collection: Ordrupgaard, Copenhagen

1914, The Four Rooms by Leslie HossackThe Four Rooms. Interior from the Artist’s Home, Strandgade 25 (1914)
Collection: Ordrupgaard, Copenhagen

all photographs © 2018 Leslie Hossack

In 2018, the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa (NGC) hosted an exhibition entitled Impressionist Treasures, featuring works from the Ordrupgaard Museum, Copenhagen. Among the 76 paintings were several from the Danish Golden Age, including five interiors by Vilhelm Hammershøi.

Leslie Hossack photographed these Hammershøi works as they hung in situ, in the NGC. Danish painter Vilhelm Hammershøi and his wife Ida lived in an apartment at Strandgade 30 in Copenhagen from 1898 to 1909. Then from 1909 to 1913, they lived at Bredgade 25. Finally the couple moved to Strandgade 25, where they remained until Vilhelm’s death in 1916. The first two images above reveal the interior of Strandgade 30 while the last two show the inside of the artist’s apartment at Strandgade 25.

Hossack wrote: “One enters Hammershøi’s private home, moves around his physical space and then slowly encounters one’s own soul… His genius is to seem to deal with the domestic while all the while dealing with the universal.”

Hammershøi’s oeuvre consists of portraits, nudes, landscapes, architecture and interiors, but it is his interiors, like the five shown above, that were the most popular in his lifetime (1864-1916) and continue to draw the strongest response today. Hammershøi painted over 100 interiors in the various apartments he shared with his wife Ida in Copenhagen. Their home was both his studio and a major motif in his work.

Over a century ago, Danish painter Vilhelm Hammershøi elevated
“Stay At Home. Work At Home.” to an art form.

Leslie Hossack’s Hammershøi Photographs are part of a larger body of work that explores Hitler’s Berlin, Stalin’s Moscow, Mussolini’s Rome, Churchill’s London, contested sites in Jerusalem, the NATO Headquarter Camp in Kosovo, buildings linked to the Japanese Canadian internment during WWII, the D-Day landing beaches of Normandy, the Nazi-occupied Channel Islands, Scotland’s Freemasons and Sigmund Freud’s Vienna.

To view more photographs by Leslie Hossack, please visit lesliehossack.com

Hammershøi: The David Collection, Part 1

1903, Room with a View of the External Gallery. Strandgade 30 by Leslie HossackRoom with a View of the External Gallery. Strandgade 30 (1903)
Collection: Davids Samling, Copenhagen

1905, Open Doors. Strandgade 30 by Leslie HossackOpen Doors. Strandgade 30 (1905)
Collection: Davids Samling, Copenhagen

1906, Sitting Room. Study in Sunlight. Strandgade 30 by leslie HossackSitting Room. Study in Sunlight. Strandgade 30 (1906)
Collection: Davids Samling, Copenhagen

all photographs © 2019 Leslie Hossack

After months of researching Danish artist Vilhelm Hammershøi, Leslie Hossack travelled to Copenhagen to view his paintings as they were meant to be seen – framed on a wall.

Hossack photographed works by Hammershøi in three galleries in Copenhagen, as well as Paris, Ottawa and Toronto. It is important to note that the 100 images she created are not colour corrected; rather, they reflect the actual viewing conditions encountered in each gallery. For example, the Hammershøi paintings in the David Collection are in a room with coral coloured walls. Thus the photographs above have a red cast to them.

Hammershøi’s works, particularly his interiors, are known for their lack of colour. But in reality, his muted grays reward the gallery-goer with a tantalizing range of luminous colours, as can be seen in the images above.

“The artist developed into a value painter, in whose work each gray tone contains an undercoat of red, brown, green, blue, for example, but whose overall expression is gray.”
Henrik Wivel, Hammershøi in the David Collection (2017)

Above we see the interior of the apartment at Strandgade 30 where Vilhelm and his wife Ida lived from 1898 to 1909. Characteristically, the sparse rooms are staged and devoid of people.

Hammershøi’s oeuvre consists of portraits, nudes, landscapes, architecture and interiors, but it is his interiors, like the three shown above, that were the most popular in his lifetime (1864-1916) and continue to draw the strongest response today. Hammershøi painted over 100 interiors in the various apartments he shared with his wife Ida in Copenhagen. Their home was both his studio and a major motif in his work.

Over a century ago, Danish painter Vilhelm Hammershøi elevated
“Stay At Home. Work At Home.” to an art form.

Leslie Hossack’s Hammershøi Photographs are part of a larger body of work that explores Hitler’s Berlin, Stalin’s Moscow, Mussolini’s Rome, Churchill’s London, contested sites in Jerusalem, the NATO Headquarter Camp in Kosovo, buildings linked to the Japanese Canadian internment during WWII, the D-Day landing beaches of Normandy, the Nazi-occupied Channel Islands, Scotland’s Freemasons and Sigmund Freud’s Vienna.

To view more photographs by Leslie Hossack, please visit lesliehossack.com