1942: Two United Israel Appeal Posters

Fulfill Your Emergency Tax Obligation

1942 United Israel Appeal Poster #1 by Lippmann, Rothschild, Zabadi, Tel Aviv 2011

 

Above: 1942 United Israel Appeal poster designed by Lippmann, Rothschild and Zabadi, titled: Fulfill Your Emergency Tax Obligation.

Below: 1942 United Israel Appeal poster designed by Lippmann, Rothschild and Zabadi, titled: And You? Have You Fulfilled Your Emergency Tax Obligation?


And You? Have You Fulfilled Your Emergency Tax Obligation?

1942 United Israel Appeal Poster #2 by Lippmann, Rothschild, Zabadi, Tel Aviv 2011

photographs © Leslie Hossack

Both these 1942 United Israel Appeal posters were designed by Lippmann, Rothschild and Zabadi. (Please click on the pictures above to see the details of the art work.)

These images are part of my series of photographs featuring posters displayed at Ben Gurion International Airport, in the exhibition: 90 Years of Vision, Keren Hayesod Posters, 1920 – 2010. Curated by David Tartakover, the colourful collection of over 30 vintage posters provides a fascinating glimpse into Israel’s history, from the time of the British Mandate in Palestine to the present day.

Since 1920, Keren Hayesod (the United Israel Appeal, Foundation Fund) has been involved in Israel’s growth. It was founded in London as the fundraising arm of the Zionist movement, and in 1926 the headquarters was moved to Jerusalem.

Initially, Keren Hayesod financed activities relating to immigration and absorption, settlement, defense, development of water resources and public works. It also aided major enterprises such as the Palestine Electric Company and the Palestine Potash Company at the Dead Sea. When Israel gained its independence in 1948, many functions handled by Keren Hayesod were transferred to the Jewish Agency, and Keren Hayesod continued to concentrate on immigration, absorption and settlement.

1938 & 1950: Two United Israel Appeal Posters

Karen Hayesod Sows, The Hebrew People Reap

1938 United Israel Appeal Poster by Otte Wallish, Tel Aviv 2011

 

Above: 1938 United Israel Appeal poster, designed by Otte Wallish, titled: Karen Hayesod Sows, The Hebrew People Reap

Below: 1950 United Israel Appeal poster, designed by Otte Wallish & Rudolph Sidner, titled: One Million in Israel, On to the Second Million

 

One Million in Israel, On to the Second Million

1950 United Israel Appeal Poster by Wallish & Sidner, Tel Aviv 2011

photographs © Leslie Hossack

Both Otte Wallish (1938) and Rudolph Sidner (1945) designed posters for the United Israel Appeal. In 1950, they teamed up to design the poster shown here. (Please click on the pictures above to see the details of their art work.)

These images are part of my series of photographs featuring posters displayed at Ben Gurion International Airport, in the exhibition: 90 Years of Vision, Keren Hayesod Posters, 1920 – 2010. Curated by David Tartakover, the colourful collection of over 30 vintage posters provides a fascinating glimpse into Israel’s history, from the time of the British Mandate in Palestine to the present day.

Since 1920, Keren Hayesod (the United Israel Appeal, Foundation Fund) has been involved in Israel’s growth. It was founded in London as the fundraising arm of the Zionist movement, and in 1926 the headquarters was moved to Jerusalem.

Initially, Keren Hayesod financed activities relating to immigration and absorption, settlement, defense, development of water resources and public works. It also aided major enterprises such as the Palestine Electric Company and the Palestine Potash Company at the Dead Sea. When Israel gained its independence in 1948, many functions handled by Keren Hayesod were transferred to the Jewish Agency, and Keren Hayesod continued to concentrate on immigration, absorption and settlement.

1937 United Israel Appeal Poster

After 2450 Years, Jews Once Again Returned to Their Homeland


1937 United Israel Appeal Poster by Nahum Gutman, Tel Aviv 2011

photograph © Leslie Hossack

This 1937 United Israel Appeal poster, designed by Nahum Gutman, is titled: After 2450 Years – Jews Once Again Left the Captivity of the Diaspora and Returned to Their Homeland.

It is part of my series of photographs featuring posters displayed at Ben Gurion International Airport, in the exhibition: 90 Years of Vision, Keren Hayesod Posters, 1920 – 2010. Curated by David Tartakover, the colourful collection of over 30 vintage posters provides a fascinating glimpse into Israel’s history, from the time of the British Mandate in Palestine to the present.

Since 1920, Keren Hayesod (the United Israel Appeal, Foundation Fund) has been involved in Israel’s growth. It was founded in London as the fundraising arm of the Zionist movement, and in 1926 the headquarters was moved to Jerusalem.

Initially, Keren Hayesod financed activities relating to immigration and absorption, settlement, defense, development of water resources and public works. It also aided major enterprises such as the Palestine Electric Company and the Palestine Potash Company at the Dead Sea. When Israel gained its independence in 1948, many functions handled by Keren Hayesod were transferred to the Jewish Agency, and Keren Hayesod continued to concentrate on immigration, absorption and settlement.

1930 United Israel Appeal Poster

Help Him Build Palestine


1930 United Israel Appeal Poster by Modest Stein, Tel Aviv 2011

photograph © Leslie Hossack

This 1930 United Israel Appeal poster, designed by Modest Stein, is titled: Help Him Build Palestine.

It is part of my series of photographs featuring posters displayed at Ben Gurion International Airport, in the exhibition: 90 Years of Vision, Keren Hayesod Posters, 1920 – 2010. Curated by David Tartakover, the colourful collection of over 30 vintage posters provides a fascinating glimpse into Israel’s history, from the time of the British Mandate in Palestine to the present.

Since 1920, Keren Hayesod (the United Israel Appeal, Foundation Fund) has been involved in Israel’s growth. It was founded in London as the fundraising arm of the Zionist movement, and in 1926 the headquarters was moved to Jerusalem.

Initially, Keren Hayesod financed activities relating to immigration and absorption, settlement, defense, development of water resources and public works. It also aided major enterprises such as the Palestine Electric Company and the Palestine Potash Company at the Dead Sea. When Israel gained its independence in 1948, many functions handled by Keren Hayesod were transferred to the Jewish Agency, and Keren Hayesod continued to concentrate on immigration, absorption and settlement.

1926 United Israel Appeal Poster

Welcome Jabotinsky, Founder of Jewish Legion


1926 United Israel Appeal Poster by Micheli Loeb, Tel Aviv 2011

photograph © Leslie Hossack

This 1926 United Israel Appeal poster, designed by Micheli Loeb, is titled: Welcome Jabotinsky, Founder of Jewish Legion.

It is part of my series of photographs featuring posters displayed at Ben Gurion International Airport, in the exhibition: 90 Years of Vision, Keren Hayesod Posters, 1920 – 2010. Curated by David Tartakover, the colourful collection of over 30 vintage posters provides a fascinating glimpse into Israel’s history, from the time of the British Mandate in Palestine to the present.

Since 1920, Keren Hayesod (the United Israel Appeal, Foundation Fund) has been involved in Israel’s growth. It was founded in London as the fundraising arm of the Zionist movement, and in 1926 the headquarters was moved to Jerusalem.

Initially, Keren Hayesod financed activities relating to immigration and absorption, settlement, defense, development of water resources and public works. It also aided major enterprises such as the Palestine Electric Company and the Palestine Potash Company at the Dead Sea. When Israel gained its independence in 1948, many functions handled by Keren Hayesod were transferred to the Jewish Agency, and Keren Hayesod continued to concentrate on immigration, absorption and settlement.

1921 United Israel Appeal Poster

Go Up and Take Possession of the Land


1921 United Israel Appeal Poster by Reuven Rubin, Tel Aviv 2011

photograph © Leslie Hossack

This 1921 United Israel Appeal poster, designed by Reuven Rubin, is titled: Go Up and Take Possession of the Land.

It is part of my series of photographs featuring posters displayed at Ben Gurion International Airport, in the exhibition: 90 Years of Vision, Keren Hayesod Posters, 1920 – 2010. Curated by David Tartakover, the colourful collection of over 30 vintage posters provides a fascinating glimpse into Israel’s history, from the time of the British Mandate in Palestine to the present day.

Since 1920, Keren Hayesod (the United Israel Appeal, Foundation Fund) has been involved in Israel’s growth. It was founded in London as the fundraising arm of the Zionist movement, and in 1926 the headquarters was moved to Jerusalem.

Initially, Keren Hayesod financed activities relating to immigration and absorption, settlement, defense, development of water resources and public works. It also aided major enterprises such as the Palestine Electric Company and the Palestine Potash Company at the Dead Sea. When Israel gained its independence in 1948, many functions handled by Keren Hayesod were transferred to the Jewish Agency, and Keren Hayesod continued to concentrate on immigration, absorption and settlement.

Ben Gurion International Airport, Tel Aviv

90 Years of Vision, Keren Hayesod Posters, 1920 – 2010


Ramps, Ben Gurion International Airport, Tel Aviv 2011

© Leslie Hossack

Ben Gurion International Airport in Tel Aviv is the gateway to Israel for most visitors. Designed by Moshe Safdie, the airport features scissor-shaped ramps shown in this photograph. On the left, arriving passengers head down to the baggage hall, while on the right, departing passengers head down toward the shops and flight gates.

Along the wall on the right can be seen an art exhibition: 90 Years of Vision, Keren Hayesod Posters, 1920 – 2010, curated by David Tartakover. This colourful collection of over 30 vintage posters provides a fascinating glimpse into Israel’s history.

Since 1920, Keren Hayesod (the United Israel Appeal, Foundation Fund) has been active in Israel’s growth. It was founded in London as the fundraising arm of the Zionist movement, and in 1926 the headquarters was moved to Jerusalem.

Until the establishment of the State of Israel, Keren Hayesod financed activities relating to immigration and absorption, settlement, defense, development of water resources and public works. It also aided major enterprises such as the Palestine Electric Company and the Palestine Potash Company at the Dead Sea. When Israel gained its independence in 1948, many functions handled by Keren Hayesod were transferred to the Jewish Agency, and Keren Hayesod continued to concentrate on financing immigration, absorption and settlement.

Beginning tomorrow, Haute Vitrine will showcase the Keren Hayesod posters displayed at Ben Gurion Airport.

Part 3: Israeli Separation Wall, Jerusalem

“Just like they brought the Berlin Wall down, so too will this wall come down.”


Detail #3, The Separation Wall, Seen from Bloomfield Gardens, Jerusalem 2011

© Leslie Hossack

The question of inclusion and exclusion permeates my photographs of modern Israel and historic Berlin. This theme underscores every image, but it is most obvious in photographs of walls: the walls of the Old City, the walls of Masada, the Western Wall, the Separation Wall, and of course the Berlin Wall.

Some observers have compared the Israeli barrier to the Berlin Wall, but the provocation, purpose and impact need to be examined separately. To borrow from Robert Frost’s poem Mending Wall, one was built for “walling out” and one for “walling in.” The Israeli barrier is still standing, but the Berlin Wall fell November 9th, 1989. René Backmann, author of A Wall In Palestine, writes: “I still can’t believe that what the entire world saw fall down yesterday in Berlin could be a solution tomorrow for Jerusalem.”

In 2007, a group of German bishops toured Israel and the occupied Palestinian territories. They were upset by the Jerusalem Wall, the concrete barrier seen in this photograph. While crossing into East Jerusalem, Cardinal Meisner, Archbishop of Cologne, said: “This is something that is done to animals, not people.” He was referring to the wall and the fortified checkpoints where Palestinians are subjected to questioning and demands for Israel-approved documentation. The Archbishop, who grew up in Communist East Germany, added: “For me it is a nightmare. I didn’t think I would see such a wall again in my life… Just like they brought the Berlin Wall down, so too will this wall come down.”

Part 2: Israeli Separation Wall, Jerusalem

“Something there is that doesn’t love a wall, that wants it down.”


Detail #2, The Separation Wall, Seen from Bloomfield Gardens, Jerusalem 2011

© Leslie Hossack

The Israeli Separation Wall, barely visible in this photograph, runs along the top of the distant ridge. For the entire length of the barrier, there are observation posts, sensing devices, and gateways controlled by Israeli soldiers.

Passage through these gateways is particularly difficult for Palestinians living in the West Bank, even if they have the required permits. The barrier restricts access to their own fields and orchards and wells, to health care and education, to jobs, and to holy sites in Jerusalem. Since construction of the barrier started in 2002, Palestinians have taken their concerns to the Israeli courts numerous times, but with mixed results.

The Israeli separation fence, or the apartheid wall as Palestinians prefer to call it, brings to mind a passage from Robert Frost’s poem Mending Wall.

Before I built a wall I’d ask to know
What I was walling in or walling out,
And to whom I was like to give offence.
Something there is that doesn’t love a wall,
That wants it down.

In 2004, the International Court of Justice ruled that Israel’s security barrier was a violation of international humanitarian law. The Court called for the barrier to be removed, for Arab residents to be compensated, and for other nations to take action to obtain Israel’s compliance with the Fourth Geneva Convention. Immediately, the United Nations General Assembly voted 150-6 to condemn Israel and demand removal of the barrier. Israel has not taken down the Separation Wall, but has continued to add to it.

Part 1: Israeli Separation Wall, Jerusalem

Is it a wall, a barrier or a fence?


Detail #1, The Separation Wall, Seen from Bloomfield Gardens, Jerusalem 2011

© Leslie Hossack

In this photograph, a concrete structure runs along the top of the distant ridge. Is it a wall, a barrier, or a fence? According to the British Broadcasting Corporation: “The BBC uses the terms barrier, separation barrier or West Bank barrier… to avoid the political connotations of “security fence” (preferred by the Israeli government) or “apartheid wall” (preferred by Palestinians).” Israelis also refer to it as a “separation or anti-terrorist fence,” while Palestinians refer to it as a “racial segregation wall.”

In 2002, the Israeli government decided to build the separation barrier to prevent terrorists from entering Israeli cities. This decision came two years after the start of the Al-Aqsa or Second Intifada. In those two years, hundreds were killed and thousands injured, many in suicide attacks by Palestinian extremists. Israel estimates that the barrier has thwarted 90% of attempted terror attacks.

The Israeli barrier consists of a fencing system for 95% of its length, now estimated at over 300 miles. Generally, there are three parallel fences, with patrol roads on both sides of the middle fence, an anti-vehicle ditch on the West Bank side, and a smooth dirt strip on the Israeli side for “intrusion tracking.” About 5% of the barrier is built as a wall made of concrete slabs up to 25 feet high and 10 feet wide. This type of construction was used for the Jerusalem Envelope seen in this photograph; it is common in urban areas because it requires less land, and provides more protection against snipers.